Why You Shouldn't Procrastinate Seeking Help for a UTI

If you’re on the unlucky side of the urinary tract infection (UTI) group, you may be all too familiar with this common condition. Fully half of all women will experience a UTI at some point in their lives. For many of those affected, UTIs can recur often. Though most of these are simple and easy to deal with, UTIs can sometimes develop serious and even life-threatening complications.

Dr. Farah Khan of Millennium Park Medical Associates urges you to contact the office if you’re exhibiting UTI symptoms, no matter how minor. Chances are that your infection is indeed minor, easily treated with medications, but if you dodge one significant complication in your lifetime, your diligence pays off. Here are some of the reasons why you should never procrastinate when it comes to treating a UTI.

The symptoms of UTIs

Since infection can potentially hit any point along your urinary tract, sometimes symptoms vary widely. Your lower urinary tract is most commonly subject to infection, typically in the urethra and bladder. More serious infections hit the ureters, the tubes between bladder and kidneys, or the kidneys themselves.

Occasionally, UTIs present no symptoms, or they could be mistaken for other conditions. When you experience symptoms, these could include:

Complications of UTIs

Treating UTIs promptly means that your chances of complications are small. However, avoiding treatments or depending on home care could lead to other problems ranging from annoying to serious. Some of these complications include:

More frequent infections

Your body could become more “used to” having UTIs. Women who have four or more infections in a 12-month period tend to be more susceptible to UTIs in general. Recurrent UTIs are typically caused by the same infecting agent.

Risks to the fetus

If you’re pregnant, an untreated UTI could present significant challenges for your unborn baby. Principal among these are an increased risk of premature birth, or of the baby having a low birth weight when carried to term.

Permanent kidney damage

Untreated infections can travel from the lower urinary tract into the kidneys causing both acute and chronic infections. Either of these could be severe enough to cause pyelonephritis, a serious kidney infection that can damage one or both of your kidneys, as well as spreading through your bloodstream to other organs.

Sepsis

When an infection does spread from your kidneys throughout your body, it can cause sepsis, a life-threatening reaction by your body against the infection that could cause damage to many other organs and their systems. Septic shock is potentially fatal.

When you’ve had a few easily treated UTIs, it’s easy to think “no big deal” about the next one, and you’re probably right. However, you still need prompt treatment to assure it remains no big deal. Contact Millennium Park Medical Associates by phone or online to schedule your consultation as soon as you suspect a UTI.

You Might Also Enjoy...

How Diabetes Affects Men and Women Differently

Is diabetes sexist? It may seem that way. Although both men and women can get diabetes, the disease tends to play favorites and treat the sexes differently. Find out what to expect from diabetes based on your sex.

When to Consider a Sick Visit

From sniffles and tummy aches to injuries and fevers, everyone feels under the weather now and then. But the age-old question remains: When do you need to see a doctor? Here are some simple guidelines to help you decide.

Risk Factors for Recurrent UTIs

Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are a commonly occurring infection, particularly for women. While they are typically easy to treat, they can recur frequently for some people. Listed here are risk factors that may influence recurrent UTIs.

Signs of Osteoporosis

Osteoporosis most often leads to fractures of the wrists, hips, and spine when failing bone strength can’t resist mild stresses that were once no issue. Treatment can help, but it’s sometimes hard to recognize the signs of osteoporosis.

Diabetes Tips: How to Manage Your Blood Sugar All Winter

The holiday season marks the start of winter, not to mention the start of high-carb comfort foods and seasonal treats that may entice with dangerous temptations that challenge a diabetic’s blood sugar control. Here are some tips for the winter months.